Friday, October 19, 2007

When Teacher Becomes Student

Last night, several students asked to speak with me after class. Turns out I've been overlooking something important and I am so grateful that they had enough trust in me to tell me. Teaching is far more than a job or a paycheck, it's way more than that for me. Now, I have the opportunity to make adjustments before it's too late for some.

You know, one of the toughest jobs a teacher has is to gauge the learner and their learning styles. It's so common for a student to either ignore their own learning style or hide it for any number of reasons. Of course, some are obvious but some aren't and unless a student asks for help, it's not only hard to give some, but in some cases inappropriate, unethical, and believe it or not, illegal.

There are plenty of teachers that would shun a meeting by an group of six students, all mature adults who were expressing concern mostly about another student who they are friends with that has a physical disability that makes it difficult for her to keep up with the computer lessons. For me, this is what teaching is all about, learning about your student so that you can do everything that is within your power to give them the best learning experience possible.

5 comments:

brookem said...

Chris, I think it speaks volumes to the wonderful teacher you are, that your students felt comfortable enough to approach you on what could have been perceived as a sticky subject. Kudos to you for that, and for being so cool about it.

radioactive girl said...

That is awesome that you were willing to pay attention and really listen. That is what makes you a wonderful teacher!

Airam said...

You're a great teacher and your students are lucky to have you ...

Chris said...

Thanks to all of you for your kind words. There's grading to be done and a podcast to be produced...until later...

AaroN said...

Pride can be a bitch, but friends who are willing to stick up for you are priceless. Hopefully she'll take this in stride and realize you're here to help, not hinder.